Blog Archives

Medical Apps that Save Time and Lives

Yesterday, I told you about Epocrates. It has been a god-send since I started using it. **See my original post to see what I like and dislike about that particular app**

Today, I want to tell you about a few (okay a lot of) other medical apps I use on a regular basis. Most of them are free, so why not?! Here are some screenshots of my iPhone’s RxP (Rx=Medical Psychologist) Medical App folder.

As you can see, I have collected quite a few. I would say they are pretty much in order of importance from left to right screenshots. Inside each screenshot, I tend to position the apps I use more frequently in the middle and corners. Don’t ask me why, it’s just how my brain works. (And yes, that’s my little boy in my background image. He just turned 1!)

The 1st page (far left screenshot) you will see:

IMG_1199

  • Rx Shortages:
    • This is extremely useful when you are attempting to prescribe a slightly rare medication because you can save yourself  and your patient a lot of time (and money) by making sure there is not a shortage in your area. A little more user-friendly than theFDA Drug Shortage app listed below.

      RxShortages

  • Epocrates:
    • See my previous post about why I use Epocrates on a daily basis.
  • FDA Drug Shortages:
    • Similar to Rx Shortages but shows a slightly different view of drug shortages in your area and is run by FDA. That is both a blessing and a curse, as it is both exhaustive and cumbersome.

      FDA Drug Shortages

  • About Herbs: or Herbal Guide on Google (Disclosure: I have not used, yet!)
    • This used to be a great app but is currently buggy and I can’t even open it, at the moment. Ugh! When it was working, it showed most OTC herbal remedies that can be used for mild (to moderate) mental health issues.
  • MPR:
    • Basic, but user-friendly and free.MPR
  • Formulary: At quick glance there does not seem to be an equivalent Google app (please correct me if I’m wrong.)
    • A very useful app for checking if a particular insurance will approve a medication you are thinking about prescribing. This is extremely important for working with patients with Medicaid! (About 95% of my caseload.) Downfall is that it is not always 100% accurate.

      Drug Shortages

  • MobilePDR:
    • This is a highly useful app and competes with Epocrates pretty well.

      IMG_1207

  • LabGear: (there are a few Lab Value app on Google but I have not tried any.)
    • This is one of the only apps for which I paid. It was a whopping $2.99, or you can bundle it with a few other Medical apps to make each one cheaper. I highly recommend purchasing it as it is invaluable when analyzing Lab Values and explaining them to your patient.

      LabGear

  • PocketRx:
    • This is app is pretty cool. It’s a lot like the MobilePDR, MPR, and Epocrates. However, what I think sets it apart is the ability to have make a “Med Box.” In the med box, you can add your Patient’s medications. It will show you: Interactions, Precautions, and Side Effects. That’s not even the best part! It will also save the profile for later reference. That is a huge time saver!

      Click the Back button to go the Epocrates Review. Or if you’re ready to see the Next page of Medical Apps, press NEXT!

      imagesimgres

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Q: What’s the difference between a psychologist, a psychiatrist and a medical psychologist?

Haha, there has to be a joke in there somewhere!!
But, for real, this is a common question I’m asked when I tell people about the psychopharmacology program.

A: The simple answer is:

“not very much” and “a whole lot” …read on.

A: The complicated answer is:

A psychologist has a minimum of the following:

  • BA in clinical psychology, sociology, or related field
  • MA in psychology (can be obtained interim)
  • Supervised by licensed clinician for 1500 pre-doc hours
  • Doctorate in psychology (Either PsyD, or PhD, EdD, etc.)
  • Sup. by licensed psychologist for 1500 post-doc hours
  • Successful passing of the National Exam
    • In the United States that is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology, or EPPP
  • Successful passing of the State Ethical Exam
    • In California it is the California Psychology Supplemental Examination, or CPSE
  • Accepted application and initial fee to State of licensure
    • California Board of Psychology, or CA BOP

source: 
Please also refer to my other post discussing the requirements that a licensed psychologist must meet prior to licensure.

A psychiatrist has a minimum of the following:

  • BA in psychology, or a related field
  • MD from medical school completion
  • Residency completion
  • The United States Medical Licensing Examination USMLE is a multi-part professional exam sponsored by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME)
  • Passing of the State medical board
  • Accepted application and initial fee to State of licensure

sources: 
-Cloud, J. (2010). Psychology vs. Psychiatry: What’s the Difference, and Which Is Better? Time.  
-http://www.usmle.org/ 

Okay, here is where it gets a bit confusing…

A Medical Psychologist can be a:

1-highly trained and licensed psychologist
WHO CAN PRESCRIBE PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATIONS: 

OR

2-highly trained and licensed psychologist
WHO CANNOT PRESCRIBE ANY MEDICATIONS 

sources:
upon request.

CONCLUSION:
The lines between psychiatry and medical psychology are becoming blurred. Though, they are admittedly VERY different fields with different qualifications and degrees. It is this author’s belief that the blur happens from a variety of sources: depictions on television and other media outlets, misinformation, miseducation, interpretation and perception. But, the most important blur is occurring due to the nation-wide scarcity of prescribers, in general! You may have noticed the increasing amount of Nurse Practitioners, Physician’s Assistants and dun-dun-dun-dun-duuuuun… Medical Psychologists!

Some people prefer to call a psychologists who can prescribe a “prescribing psychologist” in Louisiana, New Mexico, Guam, Native American territories, and some state and Federal departments (currently the only places said professional can prescribe.) Makes sense, but in Louisiana, many entities, (including the ones who license folks) call a psychologist who can prescribe psychotropic medications a “medical psychologist” even using the suffix “MP.” ex-Jen Chandler, PsyD, MP

Other similar names have popped up over the years, including: psychopharmacologist, pharmacopsychologist, pharmacology psychologist, psychology pharmacologist, prescribing psychologist, RxP, and as discussed medical psychologist. In my opinion, the varying names for this practice may highlight the general disorganization of the field of psychology. Historically, we have not been our own best advocates…

Hope this clears up some misinformation, or confusion. Thanks for reading.

Sharing is caring,
Dr. Jen Chandler

I started this blog because…

I want to hold myself and other  colleagues accountable for learning and implementing the material we are learning in our Post-doc Master of Science in Clinical Psychopharmacology so that we will pass the Psychopharmacology Examination for Psychologists (AKA PEP) the first go-round.

Here is a brief introduction to what the heck all that means!

A Post-doc Master of Science in Clinical Psychopharmacology is a post-doctoral degree that can only be obtained when the following prerequisites have been met:

  • Licensed clinical psychologist
    • BA in clinical psychology, sociology, or related field
    • MA in psychology (can be obtained interim)
    • Supervised by licensed clinician for 1500 pre-doc hours
    • Doctorate in psychology (Either PsyD, or PhD)
    • Sup. by licensed psychologist for 1500 post-doc hours
    • Successful passing of the National Exam
      • In the United States that is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology, or EPPP
    • Successful passing of the State Ethical Exam
      • In California it is the California Psychology Supplemental Examination, or CPSE
    • Accepted application and initial fee to State of licensure
      • California Board of Psychology, or CA BOP
  • Preferred to be actively practicing as a psychologist
  • Time, dedication and money for the course work ahead
  • Passing of the Psychopharmacology Examination for Psychologists, the PEP
    • In Louisiana, it is required to become licensed as a psychologist and medical psychologist, and
    • Consult with a medical doctor, psychiatrist, or medical psychologist for 3 years

I hope this gives you a helpful introduction to the field of medical psychology, prescribing psychology, psychopharmacology, or otherwise known as pharmacopsychology — more on this next time!

Thanks for reading!
Sharing is caring,
Dr. Jen Chandler

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